Laura Reeves’ Guide to Useful Plants – From acorns to zoom sticks

 

Laura Reeves' Guide to Useful PlantsFor over 20 years, I have been striving to incorporate as many wild plants into my daily life as possible.  This 216-page book is a collection of my experiences with over 65 wild plants and mushrooms.  It is packed full of stories of my experiments (some successful and some not), accidental discoveries, recipes, and directions for using plants for food, medicine, wilderness survival, and just plain fun.

Want to know how to make the best roasted dandelion roots ever? Wondering which plant will be your best friend during cold and flu season? With over 285 colour photos and 30 recipes, Laura Reeves’ Guide to Useful Plants will bring you up to speed on identifying, sustainably harvesting and skillfully preparing some of the most intriguing wild plants and mushrooms of the northern prairie and boreal forest – from acorns to zoomsticks!

Price: $24.95

8 weeks on the Winnipeg Bestsellers list!

[Your book] is quite lovely. Definitely one of the best publications by a local author I’ve had the pleasure to stock.” – Megan Ross, University of Saskatchewan Bookstore

 

Order now and have it delivered or scroll down for store locations

To order a single copy, click this button and I will mail it to you. (Shipping is $5.) Canadian and U.S. destinations only.




For 2-5 copies, please use this button. (Shipping is $13.) Canadian destinations only.




For 6-10 copies, please click here. (Shipping is $15.) Canadian destinations only.




For multiple copies to U.S. destinations, email info@psbotanicals.com.

If you’d rather pay by cheque, please make it out to “Prairie Shore Botanicals” and mail it to:

Laura’s Guide
Prairie Shore Botanicals
Box 65
Gardenton, MB
R0A 0M0

Laura Reeves’ Guide to Useful Plants – From Acorns to Zoom Sticks is now at the following locations in Manitoba (Saskatchewan locations below):

Winnipeg

Aurora Farm

FortWhyte Alive! (McCreary Road)

Generation Green (The Forks Market, lower level)

Hollow Reed Holistic (875 Corydon Ave.)

McNally Robinson Booksellers (Grant Park mall)

Neechi Commons (856 Main St.)

Ram Wools Yarn Co-op (989 Portage)

Sage Garden Herbs (3410 St. Mary’s Road)

The Manitoba Museum (Main and Rupert)

The Preferred Perch (4-1604 St. Mary’s Rd.)

Winnipeg Public Libraries

Altona

Altona Public Library

Boissevain area

Room to Grow Guesthouse 

The Sawmill (Boissevain)

Brandon

Hedley’s Health Hut (Shoppers Mall)

Riverbank Discovery Centre

East Braintree/Falcon Lake

South Moon Studio (# 42088 Wye Rd.)

Falcon Trails Resort

Miami

Miami Public Library

Minnedosa

Minnedosa Public Library

Minnedosa Pharmacy

Morden

Fossil Museum (Discovery Centre)

Morden Public Library

Floral Scents

Neepawa

Herbs for Health

Neepawa Public Library

Viscount Cultural Centre

Portage la Prairie

Honeybee Health Foods

Portage la Prairie Public Library

St. Pierre-Jolys

The Artist Pivot (529 St. Jolys Ave.)

Souris

Souris Public Library

Steinbach

Driven 2 Sew (320 Main St. in the Brookdale Mall)

Mennonite Heritage Museum

Vita

Dueck Drug Store

Winkler

Winkler Public Library

In Saskatchewan:

Saskatoon

McNally Robinson Booksellers

University of Saskatchewan

 

Email info@psbotanicals for more options

 

Chaga (Inonotus obliquus)

Update: Prairie Shore Botanicals is no longer offering chaga because of concerns that it is being over-harvested and improperly used.

Chaga is a white rot fungus that infects birch trees.  It has a long history of being used to strengthen the immune system, eliminate toxins from the body and to treat various digestive disorders.  It is anti-microbial, anti-viral and anti-inflammatory.  Chaga is well known for its anti-tumor properties, as well as its ability to regulate blood sugar levels.  It produces no side effects, even when used on a regular, long term basis.  It has a long history of use in Russia and has been certified and approved by the Russian Medical Research Council.  Chaga is currently being used to treat HIV and stage 4 cancers.

Extensive research has shown that the effectiveness of chaga is due to numerous active compounds:

Betulin and betulinic acid – induces programmed cell death in tumors with no harm to normal cells.

Melanin – antioxidant; protects cell components against free radicals.  The antioxidant level of chaga is at least 10 times higher than all other medicinal mushrooms.

Phytosterols (inotodiol and lanosterol) – anti-viral; effective against influenza, HIV and some cancers.

Polysaccharides, beta-D-glucans – modulate the immune system (and inhibit mutagenic and immune-modulating effects of cancerous tumors), regulate cholesterol levels, and boost brain, liver and digestive functions.

Triterpenes – can lower cholesterol and treat asthma, cough, chronic bronchitis and hepatitis

Germanium – prevents tumors, normalizes blood pressure and cleanses the blood.

Chaga does not look like a stereotypical mushroom.  It appears more like a black “explosion” on the trunks of live birch trees, often taking years to attain a size suitable for harvest. Though not rare, it is not particularly common, occurring on only one in maybe 400-800 trees.  Once it is removed from a tree, chaga may continue to grow, but it can take several years before it reaches a decent size again.

Chaga has three major components – an outer black crust, a brown, corky inside, and white mycelium (fungal “roots”).  Each part contains different concentrations of the mostly water soluble compounds.  (The outer black crust, for example, has the highest concentration of melanin.)  Tea made from ground chaga provides the best combination of these compounds. Note: Do not grind chaga in a regular kitchen blender! The black crust is very hard and can do severe damage to the machine.

Chaga is also known as the “tinder fungus”.  The dry, corky inside of the fungus can catch a spark and carry an ember as well as char cloth, which makes it a very valuable resource for starting fires.

 

For more information on chaga’s medicinal properties and how it works, check out 340 research papers.

Also check out the many websites dedicated to chaga, including www.chagamushroomguide.com

Sap 'n' Salvy

Sap ‘n’ Salvy Healing Salve

Sap ‘n’ Salvy

This is Balm of Gilead with a twist!  Sap ‘n’ Salvy is a combination of balsam poplar leaf bud extract (Populus balsamifera) and white spruce (Picea alba) sap.  Both are known for their anti-microbial properties and abilities to promote healing. In addition, white spruce has a history of being used to draw out infection. This wonderful, forest-scented salve has been used effectively to heal raw, open wounds, burns, and dry, chapped skin.  It also provides quick relief from psoriasis, as well as insect bites and stings. Extra virgin olive oil helps to draw the active components into deeper tissues, thus promoting healing from the inside out.

Sap ‘n’ Salvy is hand-crafted in small batches using locally and sustainably harvested white spruce sap, balsam poplar leaf buds and beeswax. Ingredients: Organic extra virgin olive oil, white spruce sap, balsam poplar leaf bud extract, beeswax.

What people are saying:                                       

“[A]s a nurse, I have never seen such an effective, all natural, versatile product to keep in my medicine cupboard. It smells like a forest-in-a-jar. I use it for myself and family on small cuts /scrapes, chapped skin, sinus congestion (a little dabbed under the nose), bug bites–just about anything. I don’t even have to keep it away from my toddler nor do I need to wash it off my hands when I’m finished applying it–just rub it in to my hands!” — Connie

“My dad is using Sap ‘n’ Salvy for his dry skin condition.  It is the only thing that works for him.  He tried medicated creams etc. and well… Sap ‘n’ Salvy works.  He use to wake up in the middle of the night all itchy and the only thing that was working was to take a shower.  Now with your salve he can get through the night.” — Michelle

“When Dave arrived, he was in pain with some kind of rash. Over a few days [Sap ‘n’ Salvy] healed him and he found relief quite quickly so he could play that night at our Summer Folk Fest.”   –Linda

“My thumb was raw and seeping….it had blistered after it had burned, and the blister had now popped. It was actually quite nasty.  I put on Sap ‘n’ Salvy, and overnight it formed a completely new layer of skin! It is still slightly tender but it is totally dried up and I have been able to put pressure on it. [Sap ‘n’ Salvy] really is amazing stuff!” — Wilma

“Huge praise for Laura’s Sap n’ Salvy – I woke up without a lot of pain, and the redness is really down. Just one massive blister to baby for a while and I’ll be good as new.” — Kris (after dumping ~3 cups of boiling water on her hand and wrist the night before).

“Everyone was nervous when Harold got stung by a wasp. (The last two times, he had severe swelling that lasted several hours.)  This time, he rubbed Sap ‘n’ Salvy into the sting, which was already swelling up and turning red.  Within 10 minutes, the swelling was completely gone, and over the next two hours, the redness disappeared, too.” — Laura

“For two weeks, our dog, Taffy, kept scratching at a sore on her face until it was a raw, bloody wound.  I applied Sap ‘n’ Salvy and within a minute, she stopped scratching.  Within a couple of days, the sore had dried out and was healing nicely.” — Carol

“Your salve is wonderful.  If I feel mentally fatigued, stressed from too much work I put a bit under my nose and it really clears my head.  Racing thoughts disappear, so add one more beautiful thing about your healing salve.  Thank you.” — Tangi

It’s awesome stuff! We use it on ourselves, our dogs, cats, chickens and goats! Heals everybody!” — Aagaard Farms

A gardener’s delight for dry and cracked cuticles. Great stuff!“– Liz  

The sap ‘n’ salvy worked amazing! Took care of my husbands head cold! He was able to breath clearly again. Totally cleared his sinuses!” — Carole

My son had a small patch of heat rash between his legs that was getting progressively worse. After a day, he was walking oddly and by day three he was in tears. One treatment of Sap ‘n’ Salvy fixed it overnight.”  — Michelle

Just wanted to mention again that your spruce schmeah works very well on poison ivy itch. This is the 3rd time I’ve used it on poison ivy. This spot of poison ivy is small (size of a loonie) but intense! No it does not spread the rash and sometimes I have to wait about 3 minutes for it to kick in. I make sure I wash it with soap a couple of times a day and I reapply the schmeah as needed which is not a problem ’cause it smells delightful.”  — Lydia

I purchased your Sap n’ Salvy this past Saturday. I just wanted to say how amazing it is! My allergies have caused excessive nose blowing, to the point where it was cracking and bleeding. Your product in 3 applications has almost completely taken away the cracks and all of the pain. Thanks for making such a great, natural product!”  — Michelle

When I showed Sap ‘n’ Salvy to my wilderness survival instructor, he said, “This is exactly what you want in your herbal first aid kit!” — Christina

I used your salve before and after work and you NEED to go on Dragon’s Den and market this stuff. The cut I showed you is sealed, doesn’t hurt any more and is healing nicely (and I am not a paid spokesperson! ) It’s far superior to anything in a pharmacy. Best prize ever!” –Dave   (Dave’s fingertips have persistent, painful cuts from constantly handling cold items at his job. He sent me this email the day after I gave him the salve, which he won for his participation in my Winter Plant Identification Quiz.)

“I’ve never had a salve work so well!!!  It is so great!! My daughter got into poison oak at the lake, my son got hives at the lake, and my husband reacted to surgical tape. (My daughters poison oak was terrible, the doctor said it was the worst case that she had ever seen and it cleared it up within days.) I also use it on my feet for cracks. It is so versatile!! It’s our go-to salve!!” –Kelly

The Story Behind the Salve

Several years ago, I took a nasty spill and split my shin open.  The gash was deep and I could see my bone. Since I freak out at the sight of needles, stitches weren’t an option for me.  At first, I used butterfly bandages to hold it together, but these clearly weren’t enough.  A friend suggested I use spruce sap on it, so I immediately went out and harvested some from one of my trees.  With sap in hand, and fingers sticking to everything I touched, I quickly realized that applying this sticky mass directly to an open wound was a bad idea, and I cringed at the thought of removing it!  I knew there had to be another way, but not knowing what it was, I put the sap aside and reached for the acorn shells.  I made a strong tea from them and poured it over the gash.  Within 30 minutes, the tissues started to dry out and pull together.  It was a good start, but I needed something else to follow this process – something that would continue to mend the tissues without drying them out completely.  I knew the spruce sap was the answer, but I didn’t know how to use it. My leg healed with a big scar. For years, the desire to find a way to use the spruce sap for healing wounds stuck with me.  When the topic of spruce extracts came up on an herb mentoring website, I asked my question.  It was ignored.  I finally realized that I needed to figure out how to use it, myself.  I spent the rest of the day concocting a balsam poplar and white spruce ointment and was ecstatic about the result! I just knew that this salve had amazing potential, and I wanted to share it with as many people as possible. Every time someone tells me what Sap ‘n’ Salvy has done for them, I am grateful to the point of tears, and I thank the trees again for their amazing medicine.

Where can I get Sap ‘n’ Salvy?

Winnipeg, MB:

Cornelia Bean (417 Academy Rd.)

FortWhyte Alive! (McCreary Rd.)

Generation Green (Main St. at Bannatyne)

Hollow Reed Holistic (3-875 Corydon Ave.)

McNally Robinson Booksellers (Grant Park Mall) – pending

Organic Planet (877 Westminster Ave.)

Sage Garden Herbs (3410 St. Mary’s Road)

The Manitoba Museum (Main and Rupert)

The Preferred Perch (4 – 1604 St. Mary’s Rd.)

Boissevain area:

Room to Grow Guesthouse (Max Lake Road)

Brandon:

Hedley’s Health Hut

 

Steinbach, MB

Mennonite Heritage Village

St. Pierre-Jolys, MB

The Artist Pivot (529 St. Jolys Ave.)

Vita, MB: Dueck Drug Store

 

Prairie Shore Botanicals: 25 ml – $10.00 (order 5 or more for only $9 each) 60 ml – $20.00 (order 5 or more for only $18 each) Please specify size, quantity, and your postal code and I will get back to you with the total cost, including shipping and GST.  (For destinations within Canada, shipping averages $10 for 1-9 25ml jars.)

Calamus Root (Acorus americanus)

Calamus (also called sweet flag or wikay) is widely used to treat cold symptoms, upset stomach, toothache, headache, rheumatism, muscle pain, tonsilitis and intestinal worms. This Manitoba-harvested species (Acorus americanus) is believed to be free of the two carcinogenic and mutagenic constituents (beta asarone and eugenol methyl ether) that are found in the Asian and European species (Acorus calamus).

If you have ever chewed on the root of calamus, you may be wondering how anyone could have come up with the name “sweet flag” for such a bitter-tasting plant!  But chew on the leaves, and you will discover the sweet flavour of orange creamsicles!

I was very excited when I discovered wikay growing very close to me.  Knowing how powerful a medicine it is, I felt very protective of the patch.  I’ve always been interested in using plants for healing people.  Though I’ve always wanted to be an herbalist of sorts, over the years I’ve come to realize that my role in herbal medicine is more of a gatherer.  When I walk across a landscape, I am constantly updating my mental map of medicine areas, so that when someone asks for something, I’ll know where to find it.

A few years ago. I walked into Hollow Reed Holistic in Winnipeg and asked Chad Cornell if there were any wild medicines that I could gather for him.  I left with a strong purpose to help heal the people who were constantly coming through the door seeking relief from so many illnesses.  I returned to the wikay patch and asked for its help.

I have often heard that plants want to help people – that they thrive when they are doing what they were put here on Earth to do.  I wasn’t sure I believed this.  I started digging for roots, mindful of my thoughts and actions, while soaking in the sounds and smells of the early spring marsh. I welcomed the warmth of the sun on my back as my hands searched for roots in the ice-cold water.  I’d only ever gathered for myself before, and as I got beyond what I would normally harvest, I found myself wondering if I was getting greedy and taking too much.  I returned to check on the patch in the fall, afraid of what I might find.  Afraid that, despite my care and mindfulness, I might have severely damaged the very plants I had sought to protect.  As I approached the area where I had gathered roots from only months earlier, I could hardly believe my eyes. In all the years I’d been visiting this patch of wikay, I had never before seen so many plants!  I stood there, completely humbled, as tears of thanksgiving streamed down my face.

Now, as a botanist, I know that there are scientific explanations for what happened in that wikay patch, but over the years I have come to realize that I am not a scientist at heart.

 

I have wikay available in 15-gram bags for $10.  Larger lots are also available upon request.  To place an order, please click here.